Whisper

Female Barred Owl

Born at Cushing Mews

Released in 2014

She's the offspring of two of our rescues. Her mother couldn't take proper care of her because of an old injury. As a result, Derek started raising her when she was 4 days old. We released Whisper with her mother in 2014. They still fly in every night for supplemental food.

 
 

Wageena

Bald Eagle

Brought in 2008

In the nest, a sibling eagle clipped her right wing somehow and Wageena could not fly. She was brought to us at less than a year old. Bald Eagles take between 4-5 years of moulting to attain their adult plumage of a white, neck and tail feathers.


Archimedes

Snowy Owl

Brought in 2009

Hit by a vehicle, Archimedes had to have a tip of his wing amputated. He is a permanent education bird. Snowy Owls live in the Arctic tundra, and occasionally venture south into the Ottawa area. In 2014, CTV news published that more and more of the birds are venturing down, farther south than usual, into our capital. This was been driven by an extremely successful breeding season in the north – the large numbers push some birds south in an irruption, or a migration into unusual areas.


Hart_CushingMews

Heart

Ferruginous hawk

Brought in 1994 and born in 1992

Captivity born

Permanent education animal


Koda

Black Bear

One of our bear cubs a few years ago. Hunters can often mistakenly shoot a mother bear orphaning her cubs. Our wildlife centre was able to rescue and release Koda back to the wild. He is one of many success stories.

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Apache

Black Bear

Another orphaned Black Bear. Apache's mother was shot by a hunter. She was later found by a family in an apple tree. The Québec Fish & Wildlife had to set up a fireman's net to expel her from the tree. In the wild, bears live with their mothers for two years before they are able to survive on their own. We taught Apache which foods to eat like her mother would have. Apache lived with us through the winter and was released with another bear, Thor, in 2008.


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